The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl

The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl Timothy Egan
  • Title: The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl
  • Author: Timothy Egan
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 140
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl Timothy Egan The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl In a tour de force of historical reportage Timothy Egan s National Book Award winning story rescues an iconic chapter of American history from the shadows The dust storms that terrorized the High Pla
    In a tour de force of historical reportage, Timothy Egan s National Book Award winning story rescues an iconic chapter of American history from the shadows The dust storms that terrorized the High Plains in the darkest years of the Depression were like nothing ever seen before or since Following a dozen families and their communities through the rise and fall of theIn a tour de force of historical reportage, Timothy Egan s National Book Award winning story rescues an iconic chapter of American history from the shadows The dust storms that terrorized the High Plains in the darkest years of the Depression were like nothing ever seen before or since Following a dozen families and their communities through the rise and fall of the region, Timothy Egan tells of their desperate attempts to carry on through blinding black dust blizzards, crop failure, and the death of loved ones Brilliantly capturing the terrifying drama of catastrophe, he does equal justice to the human characters who become his heroes, the stoic, long suffering men and women whose lives he opens up with urgency and respect New York Times In an era that promises ever greater natural disasters, The Worst Hard Time is arguably the best nonfiction book yet Austin Statesman Journal on the greatest environmental disaster ever to be visited upon our land and a powerful reminder about the dangers of trifling with nature This e book includes a sample chapter of SHORT NIGHTS OF THE SHADOW CATCHER.
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      140 Timothy Egan
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      Published :2020-05-04T23:56:03+00:00

    About Timothy Egan


    1. Timothy Egan is a Pulitzer Prize winning author who resides in Seattle, Washington He currently contributes opinion columns to The New York Times as the paper s Pacific Northwest correspondent.In addition to his work with The New York Times, he has written six books, including The Good Rain, Breaking Blue, and Lasso the Wind.Most recently he wrote The Big Burn Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America which details the Great Fire of 1910 that burned about three million acres and helped shape the United States Forest Service The book also details some of the political issues of the time focusing on Theodore Roosevelt and Gifford Pinchot.The Worst Hard Time, a non fiction account of those who lived through The Great Depression s Dust Bowl, for which he won the 2006 Washington State Book Award in History Biography and a 2006 National Book Award 1 In 2001, he won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for his contribution to the series How Race is Lived in America


    481 Comments


    1. A good booka thorough historybut dry as a throat full of sawdust in the middle of the desert That about sums it up, but of course I will continue to babble on for a few paragraphs Before reading this book, I knew next to nothing about the Dust Bowl and the cataclysmic storms that occurred in the 1930 s, primarily in the area of the U.S known as the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma see map If you re like me in this respect, than this book is a very worthwhile read, assuming you have at least a s [...]

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    2. The Dust Bowl of the 1930s is far from public consciousness today, and that is a shame There are lessons to be gleaned from that experience that apply directly to challenges of the 21st century If we are not to be doomed to repeat the mistakes that were made before, it is critical that we know what happened then, how it came to be, and what might be done to prevent it, or things like it, from happening again.How to explain a place where hollow bellied horses chewed on fence posts , where static [...]

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    3. ExhaustingSoberingDepressingInstructiveHaunting Interesting TimelyGrindingSurprisingPainfulImportantNow, what s up with the subtitle If it were really The Untold Story, wouldn t it just be a book full of blank pages Shouldn t it be The Previously Untold Story And why don t publishers ever ask me for my opinions on these things This calls for some serious pouting You should still read the book though Outstanding research and thorough presentation with lessons for us in our 21st Century short sigh [...]

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    4. I read a fair amount of history and I usually enjoy it, but I don t think I ve ever read a history book that was quite the page turner this one was What I knew before about the 1930s drought in the American Dust Bowl was this there was an agriculture destroying drought in and around Texas and Oklahoma during the Great Depression that made the economic devastation there even worse What I learned here, through the personal stories of the people and towns affected, was that the Dust Bowl was a man [...]

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    5. Of all the countries in the world, we Americans have been the greatest destroyers of land of any race of people barbaric or civilized Hugh Bennett, quoted in Timothy Egan, The Worst Hard TimeA couple years ago I read Egan s book The Big Burn Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America read in 2015 Egan is fantastic at exploring disasters and the public policy response His talent is excavating these disasters using primary sources diaries, etc He, like John McPhee, has the ability to weave a [...]

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    6. When you read The Worst Hard Time please have copious amounts of cool water or lemonade at your side This true, brutal story of the Dust Bowl will have you reaching for and appreciating water like no other story you ve ever read In fact, like me, you may even stand in the next rain shower looking skyward, face slathered in wetness, bending your mind to understand the environmental apocalypse that struck our heartland 3 generations ago.Timothy Egan s book is an example of why I like non fiction, [...]

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    7. I have about a week to read this for book club and I ve got a lot of books in progress that I hate to set aside, so we ll see how this goesUPDATE I gave up I must be the only person on the planet who didn t like this book I found the writing to be overblown, over the top, even silly at times The way it was organized didn t work for me He d introduce a person or family and I d start to get interested, and then he d abandon them and go back to large, sweeping passages about the land which made me [...]

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    8. 5 stars to a book about the Dust Bowl who would ve thought it Egan does an amazing job of combining the varied causes, and the related perspectives, of the drouth that savaged the plains throughout the 1930s Not only was it an amazing read, made personal through the stories of a handful of families in the Texas Oklahoma panhandle, I learned about one of the most influential and far reaching incidents in our country s history And the parallels to the environmental, governmental, political, and in [...]

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    9. This should be required reading for anyone living in the west and for all politicians The author does a fine job of telling the story of the Dust Bowl era, why it happened natural forces and human actions , and where we stand today It s clear to see that adding climate change to the mix requires us to develop stronger conservation policies practices if we want to avoid such a catastrophe happening again With the population we have in this area now, I can t imagine the suffering or how we would r [...]

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    10. Once upon a time there was a country where speculation ran rampant, environmental disaster loomed, and foreclosures and job loss dominated the economy It was the Great Depression, v1.0.Timothy Egan s book has an unusual perspective It is about those who stayed in Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle during the dust bowl It is the story of government supported land speculation gone horribly wrong The farmers uprooted a fragile grass ecology and destroyed 1000s of years of topsoil Raging dust storms l [...]

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    11. In this narrative, Mr Egan has written a superb account of what life was like on the high planes of the Texas Panhandle during what is probably the worst ecological disaster in US history The Dust Bowl At the center of the story is the people of Dalhart, Texas in the extreme northwest corner of the Texas Panhandle and the epicenter of the disaster The author looks at all sections of the society, from the town fathers to those people in trouble who were just passing through.I would guess what mos [...]

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    12. Now matter how bad things get today, it s hard to imagine that times will ever be harder than the 1930 s throughout the Great Plains You undoubtedly have heard of the Dust Bowl, a series of dust storms that swept the plains during the Great Depression I had heard of it, and I ve read the quintessential novel about the era, The Grapes of Wrath However, until reading this book, I had no idea of just how terrible it was I didn t know just how long it had lasted or how frequent the dust storms were [...]

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    13. The most amazing thing about this book was that it read like a story A lot of non fiction books recapping moments in history tend to read like school books Every once and a while highlighting a story then listing dry facts Timothy Egan did not do that Every word, while informative, is rich and enticing, keeping you hooked.Another thing Egan did really well was keeping thing easy to understand There were a few moments where I was a little lost, but for the most part everything was clear and allow [...]

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    14. Pstscript My husband is now reading this book and so of course we are talking about it Well, I have discovered at least two errors, and this gets me worried What other facts have I absorbed as true and perhaps are false I am left with an unpleasant feeling Error number one is on page 26 27 There it says that Native Americans were not American citizens in 1926 I wanted to know when they were allowed to become American citizens What did I find They were given citizenship in 1924 What Something is [...]

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    15. 3.5 This is one of those books that makes you realize you thought you knew something, but didn t I was born in Bakersfield California but spent my childhood being called an Okie All my grandparents moved from Oklahoma during the dustbowl period so I have always had an interest in the subject, especially after reading Steinbecks Grapes of Wrath One of my grandparents, Viola White, is still with us and has shared some great stories She is 94 years old Because of the personal attachment to the even [...]

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    16. I don t normally pay much attention to the title of a book The title s primary purpose to me is to catch my attention when I m in a book store browsing After it catches my eye I immediately resort to the GR scan feature to learn what GR members have to say about the book In the final analysis what I remember about a book is what s behind the title Frequently, when speaking about a book I ve read with a friend I will be completely unable to recall the title This book and its title are entirely di [...]

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    17. I purchased this a few years back and then let it languish, thinking I wasn t ready to read non fiction, with all of its dry, heavily foot noted prose I need not have avoided it on that count This is a highly readable account of the Dust Bowl of the 1930s There is an appendix for notes and sources without their interfering with the text.I learned so much reading this Many years ago I spent hundreds of hours doing some genealogical research on the descendants of a 3rd great grandfather Most of th [...]

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    18. Egan s Worst Hard Time is intriguing and largely well done, if a bit relentless Granted, he s writing about a phenomenon that dragged on for years, repeatedly raising and dashing ever slimmer hopes the people who lived the Dust Bowl years were literally worn out, but Egan needed to do something with the material than recreate that sensation Toward the last third of the book, in particular, a kind of sameness creeps into the narrative, as if Egan didn t really know what else to say which I suspe [...]

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    19. Egan s account of environmental disaster and personal hardship follows the lives of farm families and townspeople who lived through the dust bowl of the 1930s Drawn by a last chance to have their own place homesteaders settled into the semi arid plains of Western Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas They plowed under the native grass, planted wheat and for a few years prospered Demand spiked due to WWI and the farmers planted all the land they could This led to persistent overproduction and dramatically f [...]

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    20. This was a fantastic book about the the Great American Dust Bowl So much of this was new information to me so I was completely into it What a great history lesson I really felt for the people who settled in the area that was the most affected by this They gave it their all to eek out a living including life itself I don t know if it was because of desperation, ignorance, or stubbornness, maybe it was a little of all three and then some But achieving the American dream has a powerful pull Unbekno [...]

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    21. More like the worst hard read Actually, it s not a bad book he really captures the unrelenting grimness of the topic The resulting experience, however, is just that unrelenting grimness The dustbowl was way worse than I realized however, I knew this half way through, and spent the rest of the book wondering, like its subjects, when it would end.Well written, yet excruciating.

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    22. 4.5 STARSI remember asking my grandmother about her life growing up and she told me she grew up in Colorado during the Dust Bowl She showed me pictures of the family standing outside in a baron, dry looking area and I thought, oh, she live in an area that had a drought It is apparent to me, that I had absolutely no clue what this meant before reading this book.I d like to preface this review by saying that I found this book engaging and it kept my interest all the way through even though it is j [...]

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    23. I became fascinated with the Dust Bowl when I first started watching the HBO series Carnivale At the time, all I was able to dig up on the topic was one, small book at the library, but it left me yearning for This book is the first in depth chronicle that I ve come across, and I enjoyed it, thoroughly It tells the story of how it all started the free cheap land grab offers land stolen from the Indians, of course for farmers to come and make a go of it in a part of the country that received litt [...]

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    24. After than sixty five years, some of the land is still sterile and drifting But in the heart of the old Dust Bowl now are three national grasslands run by the Forest Servie The land is green in the spring and burns in the summer, as it did in the past, and antelope come through and graze, wandering among replanted buffalo grass and the old footings of farmsteads long abandoned This book is a remarkable accomplishment Timothy Egan introduced me to a group of hardscrabble men and women living thr [...]

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    25. It is an impossibility to empathize with the tens of thousands of people that lived through the Dirty Thirties in America s prairie land I remember statistics from junior high civics class about the extent of the damage done to countless millions of acres in the heart of the country, I even remember a picture or two from a textbook, but nothing made the story real than Egan s thoughtful and insightful book.Rather than focus on a rehashed telling of the Dust Bowl, Egan meticulously researched fi [...]

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    26. I received a cursory education on the Dust Bowl days in high school history class, listened to the folk songs of Woody Guthrie, Nanci Griffith, etc and watched the Grapes of Wrath I had no idea how utterly devastating this decade was This book stunned me and brought me to tears on many occasions Timothy Egan was able to brilliantly capture in words what you d think would be indescribable I was able to connect to the reality in my imagination and feel the desperation in the lives of those struggl [...]

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    27. Timothy Egan won the National Book Award for The Worst Hard Time While it serves as a good disaster companion to John Barry s magnificent Rising Tide, I found Egan s effort a bit dryer That s probably due to the subject Dust, Dust, Dust You breathe it, you eat it, you sleep with it, and you read it It s everywhere Well, it s than that, but by book s end, you are just in awe of the fact that those who lived in and through the Dust Bowl, would of stayed Many of them had no choice, but not all Sti [...]

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    28. What a sad tale Timothy Egan outlines what led to the great dust storms on the high plains in the 1930 s Many times I thought of a verse my grandfather passed down from his father who had lived in Nebraska during those times Nebraska land, Nebraska land Tis on thy barren soil we stand.It s not as though we wish to stay We are too poor to move away The author certainly brought those words to a stark reality in my mind And I don t believe Nebraska had it quite as hard as the no man s land in Okla [...]

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    29. After a bit of a slow start, I found myself hooked on this tale of tragedy A perfect storm of scientific ignorance, falling wheat prices due to plunging stock markets and overproduction, drought, government encouragement to over develop, and perhaps some hubris from the greedy, get rich quick fervor of the 1920 s What a story such a terrible and disheartening decade for those who survived the dirty Thirties in the cursed Dust Bowl.

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    30. An informative and enlightening account of the Great American Dust Bowl during the 1930 s This environmental nightmare caused by human error, a combination of destruction of land and the slaughter of animals, is unbelievable with photo s that appear to be from a post war novel A worthwhile read.

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