It Never Rains on National Day

It Never Rains on National Day Jeremy Tiang
  • Title: It Never Rains on National Day
  • Author: Jeremy Tiang
  • ISBN: 9789814655644
  • Page: 352
  • Format: Paperback
  • It Never Rains on National Day Jeremy Tiang It Never Rains on National Day Shortlisted for the Singapore Literature Prize for English FictionA woman fleeing her previous existence meets a fellow Singaporean on an overnight train in Norway A foreign worker is decapitated
    Shortlisted for the Singapore Literature Prize 2016 for English FictionA woman fleeing her previous existence meets a fellow Singaporean on an overnight train in Norway A foreign worker is decapitated in an HDB building site accident A Singaporean wife must negotiate Beijing as her British husband awaits a heart transplant And in different corners of the world, SingaporShortlisted for the Singapore Literature Prize 2016 for English FictionA woman fleeing her previous existence meets a fellow Singaporean on an overnight train in Norway A foreign worker is decapitated in an HDB building site accident A Singaporean wife must negotiate Beijing as her British husband awaits a heart transplant And in different corners of the world, Singaporeans and exiles mark National Day in their own ways.Jeremy Tiang s debut collection weaves together the lives of its characters across the world from Switzerland, Norway, Germany, China, Canada, Thailand, New York City and back to Singapore These wry, unsettling stories ask how we decide where we belong, and what happens to those who don t.
    • [☆ It Never Rains on National Day || Ê PDF Download by ↠ Jeremy Tiang]
      352 Jeremy Tiang
    • thumbnail Title: [☆ It Never Rains on National Day || Ê PDF Download by ↠ Jeremy Tiang]
      Posted by:Jeremy Tiang
      Published :2020-05-18T00:38:53+00:00

    About Jeremy Tiang


    1. Jeremy Tiang is the author of State of Emergency 2017, finalist for the 2016 Epigram Books Fiction Prize and It Never Rains on National Day 2015, shortlisted for the 2016 Singapore Literature Prize He won the Golden Point Award for Fiction in 2009 for his story Trondheim He also writes and translates plays, including A Dream of Red Pavilions, The Last Days of Limehouse, A Son Soon by Xu Nuo, and Floating Bones by Quah Sy Ren and Han Lao Da Tiang has translated than ten books from the Chinese including novels by Chan Ho Kei, Zhang Yueran, Yeng Pway Ngon and Su Wei chen and has received an NEA Literary Translation Fellowship, a PEN Heim Translation Grant, and a People s Literature Award Mao Tai Cup He currently lives in Brooklyn.


    516 Comments


    1. Crisp, clear and elegant writing, on the themes of escape, travel, interracial relationships, and most importantly, boundaries set by society and oneself.Indeed, the author wanted to use the German word for fear of crossing boundaries as the title of his book Three cheers for the publisher who prevented this from happening, as it surely would have turned off many potential readers buyers It would have been a shame, since this book is a gem which has persuaded me to integrate Asian literature in [...]

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    2. Superb A riveting set of interconnected stories, mostly but not only about life in Singapore and beyond it, told with precision, genuineness and feeling Tiang has the short story form down pat he sucks you in with never before told plotlines, and keeps you there with style, substance and, perhaps the hardest to do well humour These stories were such fun, and so satisfying, to read The first two were the weakest in terms of plot, but all are packed with beautifully written off kilter experiences [...]

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    3. Solid debut collection, with many of the short stories featuring the same characters The comment s been made a couple of times that it sounds like there s a novel in there somewhere struggling to get out while I do like the conceit in a short story collection, I definitely felt that part of the reason many people seized on It could be a novel is that many of the stories don t turn on their own discrete axis they re plotless, they re psychological, introverted little character sketches.Which is a [...]

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    4. jeremy tiang attempts to write from a range of perspectives voices, but locating characters in various cities across the world bangkok, china, new york, germany etc does not make them different or diverse the stories came across as hollow, lacking intimacy or hearte worst kind of characters feature in this book ones utterly unaware of their privilege in turn it came across as though the author was not aware of that the way his own privilege informs his characters the singaporeans here are the cr [...]

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    5. Of all the short stories in this book, I like National Day a lot I was able to feel the emotions by these bangladeshi bhaiyya It was a bit weird at first, to be reading I built that but I realised it s true Sure, we do have the architects, URA officers etc but the people who are directly involved in building these are the bhaiyyas at least majority of them do Look, look at them running away from their own birthday party, what kind of people are they, that would never happen back at home I have m [...]

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    6. Superb astute Assured.

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    7. Having grown up in Singapore and been living overseas for the past 6 years as a student, I found many of the characters in Jeremy s book easily relatable, and I suspect many other overseas Singaporeans will feel the same I thoroughly enjoyed Jeremy s writing style, and fully appreciated many of the hints of Singaporean ness that so eloquently captured a lot of the country s flavour The only downside is that I found myself craving what happens to these characters after the story ends His stories [...]

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    8. Another excellent publication by Epigram.These short stories woven by some repeated characters paint a real picture of Singapore and the transglobal Singaporean.My particular favourite was the one of the foreign workers and their perception of Singapore and Singaporeans Everyone should read it It will make us view the people who help build and maintain our country differently.

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    9. Beautiful set of stories that are the very making of a Collective Memory.

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    10. An excellent, enjoyable read This collection of short stories by a local author is such a refreshing change from the usual common storylines A key reason could be the setting Singaporeans in far flung Europe, in the US Of A etc Looking forward to his second effort.

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    11. A great read for every SingaporeanThe stories come together as a running commentary of the way life can be for those of us lucky enough to live, love and leave Singapore.

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    12. All of the stories linked to each other, and the characters had a subsequent development in a separate short story as the book progressed This was a detail that I appreciated.

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    13. In graceful, measured prose whose stillness masks a swirl of emotions, Jeremy Tiang probes the complexities of Singapore s identity Home and abroad, in groups or usually alone, his characters search for their place in this changing world feels both universal and thoroughly Singaporean These stories signal the arrival of an important writer Tash Aw, author of Five Star Billionaire The quietude and elegance of Jeremy Tiang s words almost belie the true power of his prose These carefully observed s [...]

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    14. A collection of stories about Singapore that are not all set in Singapore you know the type ruminations on the homeland from abroad Unlike many stories that adopt this narrative, this collection was not preachy, which is definitely a plus The language was crisp and clean no nonsense I do love nonsense, though and sparse yet elegant and evocative The stories about the construction workers and the worker from China were the most emotionally charged, but the won that won the NAC prize with the unpr [...]

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    15. I don t usually like short stories but these short stories are very enjoyable It probably stems from the fact that they are relatable to me and I like it that they are essentially like a few different threads of different people s lives, broken up into small parts that happened during different periods of time.

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    16. Definitely a readable book with several out of place characters and discordant voices whom you feel for, through the writing.

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