Maurin viimeinen huokaus

Maurin viimeinen huokaus Salman Rushdie Arto Häilä
  • Title: Maurin viimeinen huokaus
  • Author: Salman Rushdie Arto Häilä
  • ISBN: 9789510209714
  • Page: 264
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Maurin viimeinen huokaus Salman Rushdie Arto Häilä Maurin viimeinen huokaus Mauri on Moraes Zogoiby korkeas tyinen maustekauppiasperheen vesa ja t m on tarina h nen mahalaskustaan tavallisten kuolevaisten joukkoon Maurin viimeinen huokaus seuraa rikkaan ja groteskin intialai
    Mauri on Moraes Zogoiby, korkeas tyinen maustekauppiasperheen vesa ja t m on tarina h nen mahalaskustaan tavallisten kuolevaisten joukkoon.Maurin viimeinen huokaus seuraa rikkaan ja groteskin intialaissuvun vaiheita nelj n sukupolven ajan Intialaisen melodraaman parhaiden perinteiden mukaan Rushdie sijoittaa teokseensa kursailematta niin paljon petoksia, politiikkaa,Mauri on Moraes Zogoiby, korkeas tyinen maustekauppiasperheen vesa ja t m on tarina h nen mahalaskustaan tavallisten kuolevaisten joukkoon.Maurin viimeinen huokaus seuraa rikkaan ja groteskin intialaissuvun vaiheita nelj n sukupolven ajan Intialaisen melodraaman parhaiden perinteiden mukaan Rushdie sijoittaa teokseensa kursailematta niin paljon petoksia, politiikkaa, rakkautta, taidetta, gangstereita, kauneuskuningattaria, suten rej , fanaatikkoja ja sekop it kuin siihen vain ikin mahtuu.Maurin viimeinen huokaus on Rushdien ensimm inen romaani Saatanallisten s keiden j lkeen se on rikas, hauska, satiirinen ja my t tuntoinen kirja, jota ulkomaiset kriitikot ovat pit neet Keskiy n lasten tasoisena mestariteoksena Salman Rushdie on kirjoittanut komean rakkaudentunnustuksen iti Intialle.
    • [KINDLE] Ç Maurin viimeinen huokaus | By ì Salman Rushdie Arto Häilä
      264 Salman Rushdie Arto Häilä
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      Posted by:Salman Rushdie Arto Häilä
      Published :2019-02-23T20:00:38+00:00

    About Salman Rushdie Arto Häilä


    1. Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie is a novelist and essayist Much of his early fiction is set at least partly on the Indian subcontinent His style is often classified as magical realism, while a dominant theme of his work is the story of the many connections, disruptions and migrations between the Eastern and Western world.His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses, led to protests from Muslims in several countries, some of which were violent Faced with death threats and a fatwa religious edict issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, then Supreme Leader of Iran, which called for him to be killed, he spent nearly a decade largely underground, appearing in public only sporadically In June 2007, he was appointed a Knight Bachelor for services to literature , which thrilled and humbled him In 2007, he began a five year term as Distinguished Writer in Residence at Emory University.


    564 Comments


    1. This is another hard book to rate and review Rushdie is a smart, ingenious and purposeful writer Everything is cleverly thought out and his use of language is magical He bends the words with ease and brings out richer meanings The plot is an original story that unfolds as a series of riddles to a satirical account of modern India.Yet, in spite of all that, the book did not click with me The characters remain puppets As exotic cartoons they act out a sort of fable that sometimes appears without d [...]

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    2. I admit that I had already given The Moor s Last Sigh by Salman Rushdie a couple of unsuccessful tries before I finally challenged myself to reading it in one go a couple of weeks ago It seemed just the right time to plunge into something by Rushdie after I unexpectedly met him at a conference he was giving in Madrid as part of the World Book Day celebration And yes, it was a big challenge If one can love and hate a book at the same time, admire and despise it, crave for and wish to finish it i [...]

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    3. Review part 1 review showSo don t let Rushdie fool you into thinking that it is Moor Zogoiby s story and heck , they re somewhat flat, or Rushdie makes an allegory and fails on both counts both the upperstory and understory are not well developed happens when you want to ride two horses at once But, oh, dear, it is one horse, not two sigh this review just doesn t end But Rushdie is a crazy fellow, maker of an atom bomb large scale destruction squeezed into a bomb the size of a fist But I should [...]

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    4. 1st part of the review review showSo don t let Rushdie fool you into thinking that it is Moor Zogoiby s story and heck , they re somewhat flat, or Rushdie makes an allegory and fails on both counts both the upperstory and understory are not well developed happens when you want to ride two horses at once But, oh, dear, it is one horse, not two sigh this review just doesn t end But Rushdie is a crazy fellow, maker of an atom bomb large scale destruction squeezed into a bomb the size of a fist But [...]

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    5. Gripping and whimsical story spanning a century of one Indian family s business, artistic, and leisure endeavors Rushdie s writing is like candy, with sweet turns of phrase and quirky Dickensian characters, leaving the reader craving the next page With Garcia Marquez ish elements of magical realism and a pervading sinister feeling, like Dumas.

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    6. The Moor s Last Sigh is a colorful, hard hitting excursion into India Squeezed into a paperback, it spans nearly a century, and through the tumultuous history of the Zogoibys as they enlarge their pepper trade in Cochin wasn t it with spices, the hot pepper that it all started to a national scale diversification of all kinds of spices of life, cruising through the intense political scenes of Independence movement to newly acquired freedom to communal bloodshed to Indira Gandhi led Emergency to t [...]

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    7. The Moor s Last Sigh is Rushdie s best book since Midnight s Children and is superior to The Ground Beneath Her Feet Rushdie puts his spin on the multi generational family novel Like most such novels, it takes awhile to get the characters and families straight, but once you have the whole picture, you can begin to enjoy the magic that Rushdie is weaving through this genre His first person narrator ranges from funny to absurd to cruel, and Rushdie s playfulness with language is in full force here [...]

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    8. I almost stopped reading this a number of times, but I have a thing about finishing books Salman Rushdie is one wordy motherfucker, the opposite of what I tend to enjoy He s all for the word play, the linguistic jokes, the rhyming slang and colorful Indian colloquialisms, which are cute for a while but wear thin His narrative is baroque, dripping with dramatic asides and rhetorical questions to the reader, teasing hooks, and a number of other devices I don t enjoy Still, I am interested in India [...]

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    9. This is my favorite of Rushdie s It combines the lyrical mysticism of Midnight s Children with the hard nosed magical realism of the present day sections of The Satanic Verses I found Midnight s Children to have an almost apocolyptic feeling about it, especially in the later chapters this is hardly a knock against it But I feel like The Moor s Last Sigh, while it certainly comes to a climactic head much as Midnight s Children, does so in a way that you feel is, I suppose, thematically complete [...]

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    10. The Moor s Last Sigh is a colorful, hard hitting excursion into India Squeezed into a paperback, it spans nearly a century, and through the tumultuous history of the Zogoibys as they enlarge their pepper trade in Cochin wasn t it with spices, the hot pepper that it all started to a national scale diversification of all kinds of spices of life, cruising through the intense political scenes of Independence movement to newly acquired freedom to communal bloodshed to Indira Gandhi led Emergency to t [...]

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    11. This was a beautiful book about the end of Arab rule of Spain and has made me dream for years unfulfilled as of yet to visit Alhambra in Andalusia Full of melancholy and some eye opening facts, it is one of Rushdie s finest efforts and a worthy read after Midnight s Children.

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    12. I found this book really hard to get into for a few reasons I would read some and then put it down for a few days, then try to resume and be entirely confused about who was who because there are so many characters and relationships introduced at the beginning, it s very hard to keep track Also, Rushdie s wordiness made it much harder to get into the storytelling At first the story seemed confusing and meandering until I got all the characters and relationships figured out The last half seemed to [...]

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    13. Honestly, I remember almost nothing about this book something about a man who ages at twice the age that normal people are supposed to, something about his mother who I found to be the most interesting character in the book actually the women in this book leave the most enduring memories a spice plantation and fights about money This began my love affair with magic realism which has since somehow curdled At the time, I thought this is IT, this is what writing should be but since then magic reali [...]

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    14. Mislim da je kraj malo zbrzan, sto je totalno nevazno, samo mi je malo umanjilo uzivanje Ovo epsko putovanje kroz meni totalno nepoznatu kulturu itekako zasluzuje max ocenu.Jedva cekam da se ponovo druzim sa Rusdijem

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    15. The Moor s Last Sigh has about everything you would expect from one of Rushdie s novels The story of several generations of a dysfunctional Bombay family, their eccentricities and decadence, is full raw emotion and set into the colourful development of India s history With its carnival of temper, madness, prophecy, allusions and several detours like the one set in Alhambra or the world of pictures, this novel is still rather linear for the author s terms But even so some threads simply get lost [...]

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    16. The novel was an anomaly for me 5 for a book that I abandoned when I reached the middle and resumed reading after than a year It was probably the only book that I ve abandoned and continued after some time So glad I did it Magical realism at its best.

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    17. It s a long and rough read As far as magic realism goes, it s not quite Midnight s Children just interesting, rather than compelling Would still recommend giving it a try, but with checked expectations 3,8 5

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    18. Amongst the pantheon of great Indian writers Arundhati Roy, Kiran Desai, R.K Narayan, Vikram Seth and Rohinton Mistry, none of them explore the fantastical nature of Indian society like Rushdie whereas the Indian narrative form is often too deeply rooted in Anglo Saxon realism, Rushdie s imagination is far febrile and free wheeling, like Marquez, Rushdie s stories focus on social and political commentary via the form of magical realism and no other Indian author s novels are populated with as a [...]

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    19. Rushdie offers a richly detailed family saga, full of passion and genius as well as secrets, lies and betrayals Told by the multidimensional Moor of the title, Moraes Zogoiby, the tale begins with his grandparents generation and ends with the Moor s own demise But between those two points Rushdie, in impeccable form, creates a fantastical exploration of Indian history, presents complex arguments about and descriptions of art, and questions the place and meaning of various religious affiliations [...]

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    20. Even when people are telling their own life stories, they are invariably improving on the facts, rewriting their tales, or just plain making them up the truth of such stories lies in what they reveal about the protagonists hearts, rather than their deeds 135 There is nothing to be said of a Fact except that it is so For may one negotiate with a Fact, sir In no wise May one stretch it, shrink it, condemn it, beg its pardon No or, it would be folly indeed to seek to do so How then are we to approa [...]

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    21. I m going tough on Rushdie with this rating it s a really high 3 Akin with his usual work there are some incredible passages here Midway through it my interest fizzled out, either because it didn t have enough direction or the narrator seemed to be choking on his english hindu hybrid language In a lot of ways it was similar to Midnight s Children in that we get to follow a family saga through the history of India and the narrator has a supernatural issue I didn t really want to read a second Mid [...]

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    22. That I could taste the smells of a land I d never been to That if I ever had a child, I would name it Aerish That I could fall in love with the way this man took you on a little turn I read this book every morning after I returned from coachinga top the little village of Sha Tin in New Territories of Hong Kongways with my Marks and Spencer from a box cappuccino It was the first book I read there and I remember it so well because I got to actually enjoy it I didn t have to run off to work or put [...]

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    23. I read this book flirtatiously Which is to say that I used to always see the same gorgeous man on the bus He had blond dreadlocks and wore a suit, which is one of my favourite looks He always had a book with him, as did I, and I would catch him looking at my book and he would catch me looking at his book And one day I decided to make him laugh by taking the same book he was reading which is how I ended up reading The Moor s Sigh And I got totally wrapped up in this beautiful story which will sta [...]

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    24. Giliai atsid sau ir miausi ios knygos, nors po pirmosios mano perskaitytos Salmano knygos Vidurnak io vaikai , sau daviau tok netvirt pa ad daugiau jokio Rushdie Pa ad sulau iau Knyg perskai iau Ir tai jau pliusas, nes Vidurnak io vaik veikti ne stengiau o ir nelabai stengiausi Abu ie romanai man pana s, tod l tikiuosi, kad jei kada skaitysiu tre i Rushdie roman , jis bus visai kitoks Bet sp ju, kad nuo mano nem gstamo magi kojo realizmo ir Indijos politini istorini reikal vis tiek nepab g iau

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    25. The final chapters of the book, and the opening chapter, to which they loop back, are packed or palimpsested with historical allusions Moraes is not only Muhammad XI Abu Abd Allah, or Boabdil, in the Spanish corruption of his name he sees himself as Dante in an infernal maze of tourists, drifting yuppie zombies, and also as Martin Luther, looking for doors on which to nail the pages of his life story, as well as Jesus on the Mount of Olives, waiting for his persecutors to arrive It is hard to av [...]

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    26. I am writing this review almost a month after reading it.I also lost the notes , made during the course of reading but will try to do justice to it Premise The story is recounting of family history by Moraes Zogoiby affectionately called Moor while in exile Only son of Abraham Zogoiby and Aurora Da Gama , heiress to the vast and affluent spice trade business Moor suffers from a peculiar condition because of which he ages twice the normal growth rate The family saga is an exquisite tale of love,j [...]

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    27. A week ago I went to see Salman Rushdie talk about his memoirs In preparation I decided to read something by him, and picked The Moor s Last Sigh from my shelf The book had been there for quite some time, being picked up only to be put back again Somehow I just did not seem to have the energy for Rushdie s writing The truth is that this state of mind still applied when I committed to reading the book, but this time my mind was firm, so I read it from beginning to end.There is much to admire in T [...]

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    28. Kod l sagos apie eimas tokios patrauklios Ar ne tod l, kad primena gimin s paslaptis, genijus, nevyk lius ir piktadarius, kuri turi kiekviena eima, taip pat ir mani k Prisikasti iki akn vis t eimos kivir , belaiki mir i , su lugdyt meili , beproti k aistr , silpn kr tini , galios ir pinig , ir dorovi kai net labiau abejotin meno vilioni bei sl pini Rushdie ie ko akn Pasaulio per j no, atstumtojo, nenormalaus , asmenyb s, ribojamos valdingos eimos ir istorijos, akn Indijos tapatyb s.Rushdie karta [...]

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    29. I picked this book up after reading Cutting For Stone because I was looking for another tremendous book I was a bit put off by Rushdie when I tried to read The Enchantress of Florence simply because I was not so well versed in the historical setting he had used for the story I m glad I moved past my own shortcoming in historical fiction and picked this book up Although dense and a bit loquacious at times, it was splendid I loved his blend of delivery both the erudite and the simplistic, nearly s [...]

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