The Ray of Displacement and other stories

The Ray of Displacement and other stories Harriet Prescott Spofford
  • Title: The Ray of Displacement and other stories
  • Author: Harriet Prescott Spofford
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 390
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Ray of Displacement and other stories Harriet Prescott Spofford The Ray of Displacement and other stories an excerpt from the beginning of THE RAY OF DISPLACEMENT IT would interest none but students should I recite the circumstances of the discovery Prosecuting my usual researches I seemed rather to have
    an excerpt from the beginning of THE RAY OF DISPLACEMENT IT would interest none but students should I recite the circumstances of the discovery Prosecuting my usual researches, I seemed rather to have stumbled on this tremendous thing than to have evolved it from formul Of course, you already know that all molecules, all atoms, are separated from each other by spaces pan excerpt from the beginning of THE RAY OF DISPLACEMENT IT would interest none but students should I recite the circumstances of the discovery Prosecuting my usual researches, I seemed rather to have stumbled on this tremendous thing than to have evolved it from formul Of course, you already know that all molecules, all atoms, are separated from each other by spaces perhaps as great, when compared relatively, as those which separate the members of the stellar universe And when by my Y ray I could so far increase these spaces that I could pass one solid body through another, owing to the differing situation of their atoms, I felt no disembodied spirit had wider, freer range than I Until my discovery was made public my power over the material universe was practically unlimited Le Sage s theory concerning ultra mundane corpuscles was rejected because corpuscles could not pass through solids But here were corpuscles passing through solids As I proceeded, I found that at the displacement of one one billionth of a centimeter the object capable of passing through another was still visible, owing to the refraction of the air, and had the power of communicating its polarization and that at two one billionths the object became invisible, but that at either displacement the subject, if a person, could see into the present plane and all movement and direction were voluntary I further found my Y ray could so polarize a substance that its touch in turn temporarily polarized anything with which it came in contact, a negative current moving atoms to the left, and a positive to the right of the present plane My first experience with this new principle would have made a less determined man drop the affair Brant had been by way of dropping into my office and laboratory when in town As I afterwards recalled, he showed a signal interest in certain toxicological experiments Man alive I had said to him once, let those crystals alone A single one of them will send you where you never see the sun I was uncertain if he brushed one off the slab He did not return for some months His wife, as I heard afterwards, had a long and baffling illness in the meantime, divorcing him on her recovery and he had remained out of sight, at last leaving his native place for the great city He had come in now, plausibly to ask my opinion of a stone a diamond of unusual size and water I put the stone on a glass shelf in the next room while looking for the slide You can imagine my sensation when that diamond, with something like a flash of shadow, so intense and swift it was, burst into a hundred rays of blackness and subsided a pile of carbon I had forgotten that the shelf happened to be negatively polarized, consequently everything it touched sharing its polarization, and that in pursuing my experiment I had polarized myself also, but with the opposite current thus the atoms of my fingers passing through the spaces of the atoms of the stone already polarized, separated them negatively so far that they suffered disintegration and returned to the normal Good heavens What has happened I cried before I thought In a moment he was in the rear room and bending with me over the carbon Well, he said straightening himself directly, you gave me a pretty fright I thought for a moment that was my diamond But it is I whispered.
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      390 Harriet Prescott Spofford
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      Posted by:Harriet Prescott Spofford
      Published :2019-01-10T12:47:13+00:00

    About Harriet Prescott Spofford


    1. Harriet Elizabeth Prescott Spofford April 3, 1835 August 14, 1921 was a notable American writer remembered for her novels, poems and detective stories.Born in Calais, Maine, in 1835 Spofford moved with her parents to Newburyport, Massachusetts, which was ever after her home, though she spent many of her winters in Boston and Washington, D.C She attended the Putnam Free School in Newburyport, and Pinkerton Academy in Derry, New Hampshire from 1853 to 1855 At Newburyport her prize essay on Hamlet drew the attention of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, who soon became her friend, and gave her counsel and encouragement.Spofford began writing after her parents became sick, sometimes working fifteen hours a day She contributed story papers for small pay to Boston In 1859, she sent a story about Parisian life entitled In a Cellar to Atlantic Monthly The magazine s editor, James Russell Lowell, at first believed the story to be a translation and withheld it from publication Reassured that it was original, he published it and it established her reputation She became a welcome contributor to the chief periodicals of the United States, both of prose and poetry.Spofford s fiction had very little in common with what was regarded as representative of the New England mind Her gothic romances were set apart by luxuriant descriptions, and an unconventional handling of female stereotypes of the day Her writing was ideal, intense in feeling In her descriptions and fancies, she reveled in sensuous delights and every variety of splendor citation needed In 1865, she married Richard S Spofford, a Boston lawyer They lived on Deer Island overlooking the Merrimack River at Amesbury, where she died on August 14, 1921.When Higginson asked Emily Dickinson whether she had read Spofford s work Circumstance , Dickinson replied, I read Miss Prescott s Circumstance, but it followed me in the dark, so I avoided her.


    464 Comments


    1. The Ray of Displacement 3 5Circumstance 3 5In a cellar unreadThe Nemesis of Motherhood 3 5The Mad Lady 3 5

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    2. The Ray of Displacement 1903 Harriet Prescott SpoffordLikely influenced by H.G Wells Invisible Man 1897 The inventor here devises an innovation that not only allows him to pass unseen it also allows him the ability to pass right through matter However, when he s jailed after an incident when he accidentally dematerializes an acquaintance s diamond, he refuses to walk through the walls of the jail until his reputation is rehabilitated However, his stubbornness may have consequences for than just [...]

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    3. I thought this book was just alright Some parts of it was good I particularly enjoyed the ending But overall I just wasn t interested The characters seemed flat and I didn t understand why they did what they did The concept was good and interesting, but the story didn t amuse me.

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