Dark Emu

Dark Emu Bruce Pascoe
  • Title: Dark Emu
  • Author: Bruce Pascoe
  • ISBN: 9781922142436
  • Page: 310
  • Format: Paperback
  • Dark Emu Bruce Pascoe Dark Emu Dark Emu puts forward an argument for a reconsideration of the hunter gatherer tag for precolonial Aboriginal Australians The evidence insists that Aboriginal people right across the continent were us
    Dark Emu puts forward an argument for a reconsideration of the hunter gatherer tag for precolonial Aboriginal Australians The evidence insists that Aboriginal people right across the continent were using domesticated plants, sowing, harvesting, irrigating and storing behaviours inconsistent with the hunter gatherer tag Gerritsen and Gammage in their latest books supporDark Emu puts forward an argument for a reconsideration of the hunter gatherer tag for precolonial Aboriginal Australians The evidence insists that Aboriginal people right across the continent were using domesticated plants, sowing, harvesting, irrigating and storing behaviours inconsistent with the hunter gatherer tag Gerritsen and Gammage in their latest books support this premise but Pascoe takes this further and challenges the hunter gatherer tag as a convenient lie Almost all the evidence comes from the records and diaries of the Australian explorers, impeccable sources.
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      310 Bruce Pascoe
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      Published :2020-02-23T20:12:25+00:00

    About Bruce Pascoe


    1. Bruce Pascoe was born of Bunurong and Tasmanian Aboriginal heritage in the Melbourne suburb of Richmond and graduated from the University of Melbourne with a Bachelor of Education He is a member of the Wathaurong Aboriginal Co operative of southern Victoria and has been the director of the Australian Studies Project for the Commonwealth Schools Commission Bruce has had a varied career as a teacher, farmer, fisherman, barman, fencing contractor, lecturer, Aboriginal language researcher, archaeological site worker and editor He won the Fellowship of Australian Writers Literature Award in 1999 and his novel Fog a Dox published by Magabala Books in 2012 , won the Young Adult category of the 2013 Prime Minister s Literary Awards.Source brucepascoe about


    652 Comments


    1. When world famous Australian rapper Iggy Azalea was asked on a US radio show about Aboriginal people in her country, she replied The thing about Aboriginal people is they don t believe in living in enclosed structures, houses They all want to live under the stars because that s their culture, even now The government build houses and the Aboriginal people trash them and take the beds outside cos they don t believe in houses and they want to live under the stars Perhaps the rapper who later became [...]

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    2. In Dark Emu the author, Bruce Pascoe, refers to some other books discussing land use in Australia pre European intrusion I ve read Bill Gammage s The Biggest Estate on Earth and thoroughly enjoyed its challenge to read our landscape differently.Bruce Pascoe has Bunurong Tasmanian Heritage and brings a overtly political and personal approach to the question of how humans have managed and lived in the Australian country through the millennia The book isn t long, and I m not going to try to summar [...]

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    3. A rather important, worthwhile read for all Australians Dark Emu is one of several recent books another being the comprehensive The Greatest Estate on Earth seeking to shatter the many misconceptions about the way Aboriginal Australians lived before their land was taken over by the white man Arguing over whether the Aboriginal economy was a hunter gatherer system or one of burgeoning agriculture is not the central issue The crucial point is that we have never discussed it as a nation The belief [...]

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    4. This Christmas I visited a friend who gave me two precious things a copy of Bruce Pascoe s book Dark Emu and an envelope of seeds from the daisy yam, Microsceris lanceolata, known as murnong in the Boonwurrung language.Dark Emu begins by challenging the received historical wisdom about Australian Aboriginal peoples which says that they were hunter gatherers who lived opportunistically in a kind of harsh subsistence at the hands of nature Pascoe argues that this description suited early settlers [...]

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    5. I debated for a long time on whether or not I should properly review this I didn t really feel like I could adequately review a book of non fiction without sounding like a total noob But at the end of the day, I may be a noob, but this work explores a lot of really important issues about aboriginal culture and land pre colonisation and I think it s really important that people are at least aware that this knowledge exists and is publicly available.In saying that however, 1 I haven t rated it and [...]

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    6. Fascinating and essential reading for all Australians.

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    7. This is a brilliant summary of the evidence that Indigenous Australians had much developed societies than we were taught about in school Farming, aquaculture, stone houses and all described by early colonial explorers, but lost in the broader narrative of terra nullius The writing s pretty dry, but this is an important and necessary piece of work, with major implications for Australia today.

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    8. It was painful as well as enlightening to read this book Painful because my ancestors who invaded this land so brutally over ran the indigenous inhabitants Enlightening because I learnt so much about aboriginal management of the land as well as culture and spirituality.It s technically an academic text, I guess, but very accessible for the layperson In the final chapter the author suggests ways we can heal from past events and reconcile It s do able too.

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    9. This beautifully researched survey of Australian indigenous agriculture is jam packed with fascinating information about some very sophisticated land management, infrastructure building and primary production practices Pascoe s innovative approach combines archaeological evidence from contemporary fieldwork with meticulously researched archival accounts of the earliest white colonisers, whose observations of the local peoples they encountered reveal much now than they did to 18th and 19th centu [...]

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    10. I had a wonderful day reading Dark Emu Black seeds agriculture of accident by Bruce Pascoe Engagingly written, full of interesting material and a modest 176 pages , it was the ideal end of conference read.Pascoe draws on the work of Bill Gammage, R Gerritsen and others as well as his own research to make a strong argument for the reconsideration of our understanding of the way Aboriginal people lived in colonial times He draws extensively from the journals of explorers to present a remarkable ar [...]

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    11. Every Australian should read Dark Emu, Black Seeds agriculture or accident At the very least, it should be on the compulsory reading list for all secondary schools It overturns all of our ignorant assumptions about pre colonial times in Australia I was privileged to hear the author, Dr Bruce Pascoe, speak at the Melbourne Writers Festival a few months ago His emotion was obvious when he referred to archaeologists discovering grindstones proving that the Australian aborigine was grinding seeds t [...]

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    12. The first British sailors sailed to Australia contemplating what they were about to find, and innate superiority was the prism through which their new world was seen In this book, Bruce Pascoe argues that the common perception of Indigenous Australians leading a hunter gatherer lifestyle before European settlement ignores strong evidence of sophisticated farming and agriculture practices While there was a lot of movement by Indigenous Australians, there was also sedentary living, involving the [...]

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    13. As a literature review of early writings of Australian explorers, this is selective and feels bitty And some of the jumps to conclusions don t seem to be supported by the evidence provided reminds me of my Philosphy 101 class A B, B C, A C not always The strenuous arguments provided for why historic labels about aboriginal culture and practices are invalid or inaccurate seem rather pointless by all means change them but doing so doesn t change history.But all the same I really enjoyed it I was w [...]

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    14. If I could give this book 1000 stars I would As someone about to become an Australian who refuses to pledge allegiance to a British queen and who acknowledges the disaster that it was not to become independent at the beginning of the century therefore taking us trough two murderous world warsI am dumbfounded to find that Australians in general choose the Anzac spirit as the main national identity symbol.People know very little about Aboriginal culture and the little they know is tainted by white [...]

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    15. A rather important, worthwhile read for all Australians.Dark Emu shatters many misconceptions about the way Indigenous Australians lived.Dark Emu puts forward an argument for a reconsideration of the hunter gatherer tag for Pre 1788 Aboriginal Australians The evidence insists that Aboriginal Australians used domesticated plants, sowing, harvesting, irrigating and storing behaviours inconsistent with the hunter gatherer tag Have the history books been lying to us or did the government of the time [...]

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    16. I want everyone to read this book It enlarged my understanding of the culture and lifestyles of Aboriginal people at the time of early European settlement and exploration, particularly the agricultural and fishing practices Early records are revealing of so much descriptive material that did not see the light when I was at school and in tertiary education The picture of thinly spread wandering nomads needs to go I was startled at how populated certain areas of Australia were, with substantial vi [...]

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    17. This book, along with The Biggest Estate on Earth, are two recent and important books that show the lifestyle of Aboriginals were much than the mere hunter gatherers that is epidemic is traditional Australian history books.There are some weaknesses especially when Pascoe moves off the topic he obviously knows well One example is his reference to 1421, The Year China Discovered the World which is a book which has been widely discredited.Nonetheless, the book is not wordy, the photos are very int [...]

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    18. Dark Emu Black Seeds challenges the orthodoxy of how Australia was settled and what the settlers actually saw when they arrived.To the victor goes the spoils well as the right to write history their way.Reading E.H Carr s What is History during my first year at Uni was the first time I had cause to think about the nature of history, facts and evidence I was amazed, at the tender age of 18, to think that facts where selected by historians to suit the story they wanted to tell They decided which f [...]

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    19. This is one of the most remarkable and important books I have ever read Pascoe has dramatically rewritten Australian history, using a fresh approach to original sources to articulate one of the clearest examples of the maxim history is written by the victors We have been taught imperialist and racist lies about Aboriginal people as unsophisticated hunter gatherers, but Pascoe shows that first contact reports and remaining evidence tell a story of a sophisticated continental socio political cultu [...]

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    20. Eye opening and thought provoking, this short read has piqued my interest in pre 1788 Australian history I ve always suspected that we ve had a simplistic view of the pre colonial aboriginal lifestyle, but this book presents an astonishingly sophisticated culture, which has been overlooked, at least perhaps in part, because it is so alien to preconceived western concepts of culture Bruce Pascoe s book avoids those romantic cliches that amount to little than a modern, politically correct redefin [...]

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    21. Incredibly eye opening I wish every Australian would read this book.

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    22. A stunning, must read book that exposed my ignorance and left me resolutely determined to learn Thank you Pascoe for sharing this research may your reach be wide and your voice strong.

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    23. The content is excellent just a bit put off by the intermittent preachiness throughout.

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    24. The grass is pulled and piled in haystacks, so that the aspect of the desert was softened into the agreeable semblance of a hay field we found the ricks or hay cocks extending for miles, wrote Major Thomas Mitchell, an explorer and surveyor on the Australian frontier In Dark Emu, Bruce Pascoe, through the written words of early colonists and pastoralists, shines light in the dark space that is the pre colonial history of the land we now know as Australia With western centric and imperialist eyes [...]

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    25. Absolute winner Pascoe presents a pretty culturally challenging argument in well argued, substantiated, and in the end, matter of fact points Using the early settlers and explorers as evidence to describe what Australia was, and could be, under Indigenous custom, or even the best of Indigenous ecological understanding, he weaves a tale of interest and hope I also think it is a great tribute to the author that the main voice is one of wonder and hope, although there are no doubt major condemnatio [...]

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    26. Dark Emu puts forward an argument for a reconsideration of the hunter gatherer tag for precolonial Aboriginal Australians The evidence insists that Aboriginal people right across the continent were using domesticated plants, sowing, harvesting, irrigating and storing behaviours inconsistent with the hunter gatherer tag Gerritsen and Gammage in their latest books support this premise but Pascoe takes this further and challenges the hunter gatherer tag as a convenient lie Almost all the evidence c [...]

      Reply

    27. This is not a lenghty nor difficult read It need not be, and for reasons of its own history would be hard pressed to achieve length Pascoe elegantly and simply reexamines the diaries and travellogues of Australia s first white explorers From them he paints a convincing picture of pre contact Aboriginal life, vastly different to our familiar stereotypes of subsistence nomadism that are frequently based on the records of observers who only encountered Aboriginals, well after their traditional life [...]

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    28. Read this at Margo s place, after hearing him speak Really interesting survey of Australian indigenous architecture and agriculture The author is not a historian or scientist but a poet This book at times is a collection than an analysis, with conflicting claims laid side by side without critical assessment However the discussion is overwhelming, fascinating, and much of it new, to me at least Australian people before European settlement had substantial built structures, the beginnings of agric [...]

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    29. Indigenous author Bruce Pascoe s Dark emu, black seeds Agriculture or accident was my reading group s October book, and a very interesting read and discussion it turned out to be It s not a simple book to discuss and really got us thinking, eliciting a variety of responses, though we all agreed with Pascoe s basic premise that we Australians need to revise our understanding of, and beliefs about, Australia s history How could we not For my full review, please see whisperinggums 2016 10 28

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    30. Heard Pascoe speaking on RN radio and what he said was riveting The book, however, is not The content is very interesting, and debunks many of the myths about the original owners of this land Australia But it s written in a very academic style as if it is a dissertation That was a disappointment after hearing what an engaging speaker Pascoe can be Still, I m glad I followed up the radio program.

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