Music of a Life

Music of a Life Andreï Makine Geoffrey Strachan
  • Title: Music of a Life
  • Author: Andreï Makine Geoffrey Strachan
  • ISBN: 9780743475600
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Paperback
  • Music of a Life Andreï Makine Geoffrey Strachan Music of a Life May Alexe Berg a classical pianist is set to perform his first solo concert in Moscow But just before his d but his parents his father a renowned playwright and his mother a famed opera s
    May 24, 1941 Alexe Berg, a classical pianist, is set to perform his first solo concert in Moscow But just before his d but, his parents his father a renowned playwright, and his mother a famed opera singer are exposed for their political indiscretions and held under arrest With World War II on the brink, and fearing that his own entrapment is not far behind, AlexMay 24, 1941 Alexe Berg, a classical pianist, is set to perform his first solo concert in Moscow But just before his d but, his parents his father a renowned playwright, and his mother a famed opera singer are exposed for their political indiscretions and held under arrest With World War II on the brink, and fearing that his own entrapment is not far behind, Alexe flees to the countryside, assumes the identity of a Soviet soldier, and falls dangerously in love with a general officer s daughter What follows is a two decades long journey through war and peace, love and betrayal, art and artifice a rare ensemble in the making of the music of a life.
    • DOWNLOAD BOOK ↠ Music of a Life - by Andreï Makine Geoffrey Strachan
      398 Andreï Makine Geoffrey Strachan
    • thumbnail Title: DOWNLOAD BOOK ↠ Music of a Life - by Andreï Makine Geoffrey Strachan
      Posted by:Andreï Makine Geoffrey Strachan
      Published :2020-03-19T18:52:00+00:00

    About Andreï Makine Geoffrey Strachan


    1. Andre Makine was born in Krasnoyarsk, Soviet Union on 10 September 1957 and grew up in city of Penza, a provincial town about 440 miles south east of Moscow As a boy, having acquired familiarity with France and its language from his French born grandmother it is not certain whether Makine had a French grandmother in later interviews he claimed to have learnt French from a friend , he wrote poems in both French and his native Russian.In 1987, he went to France as member of teacher s exchange program and decided to stay He was granted political asylum and was determined to make a living as a writer in French However, Makine had to present his first manuscripts as translations from Russian to overcome publishers skepticism that a newly arrived exile could write so fluently in a second language After disappointing reactions to his first two novels, it took eight months to find a publisher for his fourth, Le testament fran ais Finally published in 1995 in France, the novel became the first in history to win both the Prix Goncourt and the Prix Medicis plus the Goncourt des Lyc ens.


    551 Comments


    1. At 106 pages, this is a very short novel, but a very powerful and haunting one Makine is a master at finding emotion in small details This book opens with a narrator who is forced to spend a snowy night at a crowded station in the far east of the Soviet Union He stumbles on an old man at a piano going through the motions of playing but barely touching the keys This man helps him find a way on to the train and describes his life story over the course of the train journey to Moscow Like the first [...]

      Reply

    2. This is the story of a thwarted life told to a stranger on a train And there s a fair amount of time to tell it The train runs from Siberia to Moscow, but still, considerable compression is necessary The book is short and the end is always near I stared into space a good 15 minutes once it came I had to get my bearings again This is a story that could have been mired in all kinds of sentimental clich The man was, after all, almost a concert pianist And at least 2 moments occur in the tale where [...]

      Reply

    3. This is a novel that appeals to the sensitivity of the reader through its simplicity and musicality Framed by the waiting in a train station, the ride by train through the immensity of Russian lands covered by snow and the arrival to Moscow, this is a story of a life whose musicality although extirpated with brutality by the regime of those times, was mended by its hero with whatever meager means he had in hand The story of a person who longs for music in his life and who, thanks to the power of [...]

      Reply

    4. For a short book, this packs a huge punch The story is told through a narrator of a Russian man who, several days before his debut performance as a concert pianist, must flee Moscow His is a harrowing tale of fear, uncertainty, determination, and adaptation to a new life as a soldier The emotions are palpable and, in the end, the resolution a relief This book, which was written in French, was the winner of the 2001 Grand Prix RTL Lire and is a great introduction to the work of this Russian autho [...]

      Reply

    5. This book is about identities The identity we present to the world, our real identity, the identity of a nation, the identity of a country Alexe Berg, is forced to take the identity of a fallen soldier in 1941 He does this in order to escape from the security police that arrested both his parents With his new identity, he has to shed his old identity his childhood in Moscow, his promising piano talent, his intellectual background He is now a new person, with a new past and a new future, a new na [...]

      Reply

    6. A gem of a book, set in Russia pre and post Second World War It sets into context an individual life with upheaval, death and chaos all around.

      Reply

    7. A train station like a dot in the snow covered expanse of the Siberian plains People, thrown together by chance, patiently waiting hours for the delayed train to Moscow Reflecting on the crowd as a collective sample of homo sovieticus , the narrator singles out some individuals He describes them in minute detail, bringing them alive for the reader Suddenly, a piano tune, played elsewhere, breaks the multitude of muted night noises in the waiting room For the narrator, the music transcends place [...]

      Reply

    8. I started reading A Life s Music quite a while ago and after only a few pages, put the book aside I m not sure why but luckily I picked it up only a few days ago and this time was blown away by the story of the pianist Alexei Berg It is the story of a young man who, in 1941, lost everything in one of Stalin s purges his parents, his budding carer as a concert pianist, even his identity Makine s writing is the best that I have encountered in a long time Not since Nemirovsky s Suite Francaise have [...]

      Reply

    9. Opening lines I could quite easily put a date to that encounter.

      Reply

    10. , , 94 20 , , , , 30 , 30 , , , , , , , , , , , .

      Reply

    11. Many people hear a song all their life, like a life source, without even knowing the source And there are those who play very rarely yet all their life is about it A story told by the second to the first kind Truth, love, tragedy, melancholy and that shining hope that drives life forward all for an epic are in this novella.It sure has the essence of europe and soviet blended together.

      Reply

    12. Years ago, the celebrated Russian logician Alexander Zinoviev coined the sarcastic phrase Homo Sovieticus to explore how a new species with a specific mindset evolved as a result of the Communist system In Andrei Makine s exquisite and dreamlike 109 page novella, the reader learns about this new species through the person of Alexei Berg, a one time brilliant young pianist.Not unlike Coleridge s The Ancient Mariner, he happens across the narrator who is enduring a transportation delay with human [...]

      Reply

    13. , , , , , homo sovieticus, , , , , , , , , , .

      Reply

    14. No spoilers in this comment This is a tiny 112 pages but very good bookIt was hard for me to get engaged with the story for the first 20 pages or so It felt that the author was aimlessly describing different characters without any intention of following up on any of them But after about page 20, the story finds purposeFor me the author s style of writing was as much interesting as the actual story His metaphors are fresh and catching His style, typical of most Russian and French authors, appeale [...]

      Reply

    15. This book was just ok The story could have been interesting, but it was much too short to really get very involved in the story I kept finding myself wanting further descriptions and explanations where there were none which left the reader to simply guess at what exactly was happening in the story The text was originally written in French and translated into English so perhaps some of the portions that didn t make complete sense were actually lost in translation Probably wouldn t highly recommen [...]

      Reply

    16. A whole life very typical of its time and country condensed into such a short piece of work Some unforgettable images reminiscent of classic Russian literature the door blasting open and letting the chill air and snow in at the railway station where the characters are waiting for their delayed train The trawling among corpses for an identity horrifying and very moving The love story did not seem terribly convincing, or perhaps this is a man who is emotionally stunted and unable to admit his emot [...]

      Reply

    17. Russian wartime literature historicized its amazing what the filter of time can do to a genre But this book isn t just unique and stunning because of the fact the writer is not of the same generation as Pasternak and Babel yet muses on the material with as much authority of experience He also brings recollection and a magical element of imagination to this very tragic story.

      Reply

    18. Short and sweet book that reads like Kurt Vonnegut It s pretty good, just needed too be abit longer to reach that 4 stars.

      Reply

    19. , , 5 , , , , , , , , , , , , homo sovieticus , , , , , , , , .

      Reply

    20. Mon avis sur ce livre me semble difficile r diger, comme si je savais d j que je ne garderai pas un souvenir marquant de celui ci, pas plus que lors de ma premi re lecture dont je me rappelais peine Ce n est pas qu il soit d plaisant, ni m me insignifiant, mais il ne s imprime pas en moi et glisse, au contraire, comme un fr lement agr able, mais ph m re et vite oubli Sans pouvoir expliquer pourquoi, je me sens imperm able cette uvre.La raison de mon incompr hension face cette indiff rence ressen [...]

      Reply

    21. The narrator of this novel meets Alexei Berg in a train station in the Urals He is told the story of the last twenty years of Alexei s life as the two men travel by train to Moscow Alexei Berg s parents, a dramatist and an opera singer, were arrested during Stalin s reign of terror in 1941 Alexei, a classical pianist student, avoided arrest and made his way to the Ukraine, close to the Polish border, where he had relatives hide him When the Germans invaded the Ukraine, Alexei took on the identit [...]

      Reply

    22. I found it difficult to get into this book The protagonist seems to be emotionally detached for most of the story, which made it hard to connect with him I think, however, this was intentional albeit ineffective I believe the author is making a statement on artists that are starved for our art form Indeed the only times I truly felt I knew the character was when he was playing the piano And I believe any true artist understands the dwindling life force when you are kept from your art, and then t [...]

      Reply

    23. About page 54 things started to get interesting, and the pages seemed to fly by from there And then it ended abruptly I wanted to know about the ending , I know about leaving it to the reader to know but I still want the writer to go into detail Overall there wasn t a clear plot, and I found it hard to track the storyline because of the style of writing but it had a really good essence and I liked the character it focuses on Because it was so short there are bound to be hundreds of unanswered q [...]

      Reply

    24. This book is about identities that play a role within the human history Two world confronted, one that claims and please social compliance with current institutions and rhe counter one that claim follow your own voice no matter how much the John s weight Rich vocabulary, edging with poetry, a drama that portrait human misery and Greatness Beautiful narrative, a short rich story.

      Reply

    25. 4 5 stars I found it a bit hard to get into at first, but once I really became invested in the story, I enjoyed it I felt like a lot of ends were left loose, though, but I still gave it the rating that I did because the writing was beautiful, fluid poetry, and I was impressed that Makine managed to get so much of a story into only 109 pages.

      Reply

    26. I saw a description describing this book as a novella with the ambition of a novel I think that is a perfect description, in a very good way Makine is able to express an awful lot in a limited number of pages in fact, he may explain the phrase Homo sovieticus better than any definition ever could , and the writing is exceptional I m definitely looking forward to reading by this author.

      Reply

    27. La nuit travers laquelle il avan ait disait et ce mal, et cette peur, et l irr m diable brisure du pass mais tout cela tait d j devenu musique et n existait que par sa beaut.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *