Mechthild of Magdeburg: The Flowing Light of the Godhead

Mechthild of Magdeburg: The Flowing Light of the Godhead Mechtild of Magdeburg Frank Tobin
  • Title: Mechthild of Magdeburg: The Flowing Light of the Godhead
  • Author: Mechtild of Magdeburg Frank Tobin
  • ISBN: 9780809137763
  • Page: 489
  • Format: Paperback
  • Mechthild of Magdeburg: The Flowing Light of the Godhead Mechtild of Magdeburg Frank Tobin Mechthild of Magdeburg The Flowing Light of the Godhead Here is the first English translation based on the new critical edition of The Flowing Light of the Godhead the sole mystical visionary work of Mechthild a th century c c German Begui
    Here is the first English translation based on the new critical edition of The Flowing Light of the Godhead, the sole mystical visionary work of Mechthild, a 13th century c 1260 c 1282 94 German Beguine This challenging work of deep religious insight reflects Mechthild s inner life, and God s as well, employing a great variety of traditional medieval literary forms anHere is the first English translation based on the new critical edition of The Flowing Light of the Godhead, the sole mystical visionary work of Mechthild, a 13th century c 1260 c 1282 94 German Beguine This challenging work of deep religious insight reflects Mechthild s inner life, and God s as well, employing a great variety of traditional medieval literary forms and genres in prose and verse.
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      489 Mechtild of Magdeburg Frank Tobin
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      Posted by:Mechtild of Magdeburg Frank Tobin
      Published :2020-01-19T11:48:47+00:00

    About Mechtild of Magdeburg Frank Tobin


    1. Mechthild or Mechtild of Magdeburg c 1207 c 1282 1294 , a Beguine, was a medieval mystic, whose book Das flie ende Licht der Gottheit The Flowing Light of Divinity described her visions of God.Definite biographical information about Mechthild is scarce what is known of her life comes largely from scattered hints in her work She was probably born to a noble Saxon family, and claimed to have had her first vision of the Holy Spirit at the age of twelve In 1230 she left her home to become a Beguine at Magdeburg There, like Hadewijch of Antwerp, she seems to have exercised a position of authority in a beguine community In Magdeburg she became acquainted with the Dominicans and became a Dominican tertiary It seems clear that she read many of the Dominican writers It was her Dominican confessor, Henry of Halle, who encouraged and helped Mechthild to compose The Flowing Light.Her criticism of church dignitaries, religious laxity and claims to theological insight aroused so much opposition that some called for the burning of her writings With advancing age, she was not only alone, and the object of much criticism but she also became blind Around 1272, she joined the Cistercian nunnery at Helfta, who offered her protection and support in the final years of her life, and where she finished writing down the contents of the many divine revelations she claimed to have experienced According to Professor Kate Lindemann, it speaks much of this community and its Abbess, that they would embrace a woman who was over 60 years of age, in poor health and so isolated by society It is unclear whether she actually formally joined the Cistercian community or if she simply resided there and participated in the religious services but did not take Cistercian vows The nuns of Helfta were highly educated and important works of mysticism survive from Mechthild s younger contemporaries, St Mechthild of Hackeborn and St Gertrude the Great.It is unclear when Mechthild died 1282 is a commonly cited date, but some scholars believe she lived into the 1290s.


    161 Comments


    1. This is not a fast or an easy read, but every page is worth it Mechthild de Magdeburg writes with a stunning lucidity that feels almost modern, even multiple centuries and translations later I approached this book as someone with no adherence to any specific religion and spirituality, and I was rewarded with a bizarre, sensual, and highly personal glimpse into Mechthild s own relationship with her God You read with her for forty years of her life, a long time by any standard For the first time i [...]

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    2. I read through this quickly for my thesis on Medieval Beguine mystics I was originally going to do a chapter on her, but time constraints lead me to drop a chapter, so I decided to drop hers I shouldn t say too much about her, because I can hardly be fair Her poetry is probably her supreme value to readers of mystical spirituality My thesis, however, was to evaluate her theology, which was rather neo platonic spirit is good and the body is bad She is, however, part of the tradition of love mysti [...]

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    3. The interesting points in this very unusual early Christian mystical texts 1 Written in the vernacular makes the highly unapproachable Church accessible for a largely illiterate medieval audience2 The anthropomorphic depiction of God God as a lover in contrast to Augustine s incorporeal God 3 Metaphysical quandaries

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    4. This book is written by a Contemplative in the 14th or 15th century It is mostly poetry but quite interesting It is not for everyone but I have enjoyed reading it and come back to it often.

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    5. Interesting if you re into Medieval mystics Don t read it if you re not.

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    6. sweet dew of the Holy Trinity.

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